Spicy Wok-Seared Edamame

It's the spicy, sticky coating that transforms this basic bean into a powerhouse of flavor.

June 20, 2017

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons white miso
  • 2 tablespoons futsu-shu (standard) sake, such as Gekkeikan
  • 2 teaspoons Japanese soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons fresh ginger juice
  • 1 teaspoon sriracha
  • ½ teaspoon Vietnamese or Thai fish sauce
  • ½ teaspoon hoisin sauce
  • Pinch of Chinese five-spice powder
  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 1 pound thawed frozen edamame in pods, patted completely dry

Instructions

Whisk the miso, sake, soy sauce, ginger juice, sriracha, fish sauce, hoisin sauce, and five-spice powder together in a small bowl.

Heat a large wok or cast iron skillet over high heat until the wok is very hot. Pour the oil down the sides of the wok. Swirl the wok by its handle(s) to lightly coat the inside. Add the edamame, allowing the flat sides of as many edamame as possible to directly touch the wok sides. Cook, without stirring, until the pods are lightly charred, about 2 minutes. Stir and cook to create more charred spots, about 2 minutes more. Add ¼ cup water and cover the wok. Cook until the water is evaporated and the edamame is hot, about 2 minutes.

Stir in the miso mixture. Cook, stirring oft en, until the mixture has reduced to a glaze, about 1 minute. Transfer to a serving bowl. Serve hot, and eat the edamame with your fingers—with a lot of licking.

About this recipe

“When you’ve eaten edamame in the past, they were probably served at a Japanese restaurant with some salt sprinkled on top. My edamame feature a spicy, sticky coating that transforms this basic bean into a powerhouse of flavor. With the finger licking required to eat them, a platter of sticky edamame is a surefire icebreaker, no matter who is sitting at the table. Don’t be afraid to really char your pods, as the

blackened spots are essential to the overall flavor.

While you can buy bottled ginger juice in the baking aisle of some specialty markets, homemade juice is easy to make. To make it, purchase very fresh, plump ginger with tight, smooth skin. For each tablespoon of juice, shred about 1 inch of the ginger (no need to peel it) on the large holes of a box shredder. Working over a bowl, squeeze the shredded ginger in your fist to extract the juice. That’s it.” – Chris Santos

Excerpted from the book SHARE by Chris Santos. Copyright © 2017 by Chris Santos. Reprinted with permission of Grand Central Life & Style. All rights reserved. 

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Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons white miso
  • 2 tablespoons futsu-shu (standard) sake, such as Gekkeikan
  • 2 teaspoons Japanese soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons fresh ginger juice
  • 1 teaspoon sriracha
  • ½ teaspoon Vietnamese or Thai fish sauce
  • ½ teaspoon hoisin sauce
  • Pinch of Chinese five-spice powder
  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 1 pound thawed frozen edamame in pods, patted completely dry
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