The Sazerac

This drink really is a masterpiece. The original called for Cognac instead of rye, and the brand of Cognac used was called Sazerac – hence the name.

July 31, 2017

Ingredients

  • 2 fl oz rye whiskey
  • 1 white sugar cube
  • 3 dashes Peychaud’s bitters
  • Absinthe, to rinse
  • Lemon twist, to garnish

Instructions

Add the sugar cube and bitters to a mixing glass. Crush the cube with a muddler and add rye. Add ice and stir. Fill a Sazerac glass with crushed ice to chill.

Empty the ice then rinse with the absinthe and drain (or drink). Strain the drink into the glass and garnish with a lemon twist.

About this recipe

“This was the very first drink I had at Little Branch back in 2005. There are four drinks that made me fall so deeply in love with cocktails – the Sazerac, the Gin Mule, the New York Flip, and the Montreal Sour.

This drink really is a masterpiece. The original called for Cognac instead of rye, and the brand of Cognac used was called Sazerac – hence the name. Today, the most popular version calls for rye whiskey. If a mixture of rye and Cognac is used, we call it a New York Sazerac.

The lemon twist is essential, but as Stanley Clisby Arthur declared in his 1937 text Famous New Orleans Drinks and How to Mix ‘em, ‘do not commit the sacrilege of dropping the peel into the drink’. Squeeze the twist over the top of the drink to expel the oils then lay it across the top of the glass.” --  from A Spot at the Bar by Michael Madrusan and Zara Young.

Recipe excerpted with permission from A Spot at the Bar by Michael Madrusan and Zara Young, Illustrated by Adam Nickel.

Ingredients

  • 2 fl oz rye whiskey
  • 1 white sugar cube
  • 3 dashes Peychaud’s bitters
  • Absinthe, to rinse
  • Lemon twist, to garnish
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