Lingcod with Mushrooms and Black Truffle Vinaigrette

A feast of umami, this lingcod and mushroom dish is the stuff of winter’s-night dinner parties.

October 10, 2017

Ingredients

For the black truffle vinaigrette
  • Zest and juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 1 1/2 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 tsp honey
  • 1 tsp black truffle paste
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt
  • 1/2 cup canola oil
For the mushroom puree
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 shallot, finely chopped
  • 1 lb cremini or fresh shiitake mushrooms, stemmed and cut into quarters
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 sprig thyme
  • 2 cups Vegetable Stock
For the sautéed mushrooms
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 2 Tbsp unsalted butter (divided)
  • 2 Tbsp unsalted butter (divided)
  • 1 lb fresh wild mushrooms, roughly chopped
  • Sea salt and coarsely ground black pepper
  • 1 shallot, finely chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • 2 Tbsp finely chopped fresh chives
For the pan-seared lingcod
  • 4 (4 to 5 oz) skinless lingcod fillets
  • Sea salt and coarsely ground black pepper
  • 1 Tbsp canola oil
  • 2 Tbsp unsalted butter
  • 2 sprigs thyme, leaves only
  • 1 lemon, halved
  • 1/2 bunch watercress, stems removed, for garnish

Instructions

Make the Black Truffle Vinaigrette

Combine the lemon zest and juice, mustard, honey, truffle paste, and salt and pepper in a medium bowl. While whisking, slowly drizzle the oil in a thin steady stream until incorporated and the mixture is emulsified. Adjust seasoning to taste. (Alternatively, you can do this with an immersion blender or in a blender or small food processor.) Can be made ahead of time; will keep refrigerated for up to 2 weeks (although the lemon flavor will start to weaken after a few days).

Make the Mushroom Puree

Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the shallots and sauté for 3 minutes. Add the mushrooms, salt, and thyme. Pour in the broth. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and cook for 10 minutes or until the mushrooms are tender. Remove the thyme sprig and discard. Transfer the mixture into a blender and puree until smooth. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve.

Make the Sautéed Mushrooms

Heat the oil and 1 tablespoon of the butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the mushrooms in a single layer, season with salt and pepper to taste, and sauté, stirring occasionally, for about 3 minutes or until golden brown. Transfer to a plate. (Don’t crowd the mushrooms or they will steam instead of sear. You may have to sauté in batches.)

Reduce the heat to medium and add the remaining tablespoon of butter. Add the shallots and sauté for 2 minutes. Add the garlic and sauté another minute. Stir in the sautéed mushrooms and the chives. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Make the Lingcod

Preheat the oven to 400°F. Use paper towels to pat the fish dry and season with salt and pepper. Heat the oil in a heavy-bottomed, ovenproof skillet over medium-high heat until almost smoking. Carefully lay the fish in the pan. (If necessary, cook the fish in batches to prevent overcrowding, which will keep the fish from caramelizing properly.) Reduce the heat to medium and cook for 1 minute or until a golden crust forms on the skin. Flip the fillets over and cook for another 2 to 3 minutes or until browned. Place the pan in the oven and roast for 4 minutes or until fish is opaque in the center and flakes easily.

Remove from the oven and add the butter and thyme to the pan. Allow the butter to melt while you squeeze the lemon over the fish. Use a spoon to baste each fillet with the buttery juices for about 1 minute. Transfer to a plate.

To assemble, spread the mushroom puree on each plate, add the sautéed mushrooms, and top with the fish. Drizzle over the truffle vinaigrette, and garnish with watercress.

Chef’s note: You can substitute half the stock with whipping cream for a rich and creamy puree.

About this recipe

“A feast of umami, this lingcod and mushroom dish is the stuff of winter’s-night dinner parties, when there’s nowhere you’d rather be than indoors, cozy with your loved ones. Luxury ingredients, such as the black truffle paste in the dressing, are an investment—but a little goes a long way. I prefer truffle paste rather than oil for its subdued aroma and flavor, which allows the other elements to be more assertive. Buy it at gourmet markets or through online retailers.” – Ned Bell


Recipe & excerpt from Lure: Sustainable Seafood Recipes from the West Cost, by Ned Bell with Valerie Howes. Republished with permission from Figure 1 Publishing Inc. 

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Ingredients

For the black truffle vinaigrette
  • Zest and juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 1 1/2 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 tsp honey
  • 1 tsp black truffle paste
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt
  • 1/2 cup canola oil
For the mushroom puree
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 shallot, finely chopped
  • 1 lb cremini or fresh shiitake mushrooms, stemmed and cut into quarters
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 sprig thyme
  • 2 cups Vegetable Stock
For the sautéed mushrooms
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 2 Tbsp unsalted butter (divided)
  • 2 Tbsp unsalted butter (divided)
  • 1 lb fresh wild mushrooms, roughly chopped
  • Sea salt and coarsely ground black pepper
  • 1 shallot, finely chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • 2 Tbsp finely chopped fresh chives
For the pan-seared lingcod
  • 4 (4 to 5 oz) skinless lingcod fillets
  • Sea salt and coarsely ground black pepper
  • 1 Tbsp canola oil
  • 2 Tbsp unsalted butter
  • 2 sprigs thyme, leaves only
  • 1 lemon, halved
  • 1/2 bunch watercress, stems removed, for garnish
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