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Milking the food news


Milk illustration: Andy Fish

Milk illustration: Andy Fish



The milk wars continue. Former Washington Post reporter Ed Bruske, who wrote a fascinating series on Washington D.C. school lunches for his blog The Slow Cook (see Tales from a DC School Kitchen) takes on WaPo columnist Petula Dvorak who sees nothing wrong with offering kids chocolate milk for lunch. Says Dvorak in her column Just can’t swallow the anti-chocolate milk argument: Thousands of children across the nation returned to school without the comfort of a carton of cold, chocolate yum on their cafeteria trays thanks to the same thinking that has also robbed them of Halloween candy, dodge ball, knee scrapes on playground asphalt, peanut butter and a suspect grayish matter our cafeteria ladies insisted was “turkey à la king.

What Dvorak doesn’t seem to get is that when it comes to food pairings, white milk is the de facto choice for turkey à la king.
But Bruske makes an even better argument:

By Dvorak’s logic, we should just add sugar to foods we want kids to eat. If they don’t like carrots, let’s serve them carrot cake instead. If they won’t eat their spinach, let’s hide it in a brownie…In fact, sugar is the go-to ingredient in under-funded school cafeterias. Not only does it induce kids to buy the food in the federally-subsidized meal line, it’s a cheap source of the calories the government says kids must be served if schools are to qualify for those federal funds.

Continue reading Let’s Hear It for Sugar in School Food!.

Related:
Apparently, milk really does do a body good > Milk the Ultimate Sports Drink: Research shows its proteins beat those other liquids post-workout.

CHOW has the foodie angle covered: It’s white, hot, and people are high for it. The drink formerly known as milk.


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edinst

We’re slowly putting together our program for Edible Institute 2011 (what is Edible Institute? See this: video clip from E.I. 2010) and we are happy to announce we’ve confirmed Joan Gussow as one of the keynote speakers. For more on Joan, check out Brian Halweil’s Edible Manhattan post > Movement Matriarch: Joan Gussow (and Why She is the Toast of Pollan, Barber, Kingsolver and Me)

Related:
The Roast Report: Why Joan Gussow is a Dangerous Woman


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2010fw

Edible Iowa River Valley publisher Kurt Michael Friese blogged from the Greenbrier’s 20th Annual Food Writers Symposium. Those attending included Dorothy Kalins (founding editor of Saveur) , cookbook authors James Peterson and Anne Willan, editors Joe Yonan (Washington Post) and Laurie Buckle (Fine Cooking). Read Kurt’s excellent coverage of the four-day event here:
Greenbrier Day One
Greenbrier Day Two
Greenbrier Day Three
Greenbrier Day Four


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archibald-1

This week, Edible Radio host and publisher of Edible Santa Fe, Kate Manchester, talks to Amanda Archibald about food and health in the U.S. and global marketplace.

Amanda’s extensive knowledge and understanding of food and health in U.S. global marketplaces comes from living and working in both the U.S. and Europe. Her lifetime of respect for the journey that food makes from the field to the plate helps to shape her vision. Trained as a dietitian and inspired by parents whose love of food and culture was deeply instilled in her, Amanda has spent more than 14 years fine-tuning ways to engage people and get them truly excited about food.
Listen to the Edible Radio Episode 51 Kitchen Sync – Amanda Archibald

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